Cfp_Domesticizing Financial Economies_Mini-Conference SASE 2014_Chicago

Invitamos en enviar resúmenes a la mini-conferencia “Domesticizing Financial Economies: Knitting Fibers of Transaction, Algorithm and Exchange” que formará parte de la Reunión de SASE 2014 en Chicago. Cordialmente, Jeanne Lazarus, Mariana Luzzi y José Ossandón

Domesticizing Financial Economies: Knitting Fibers of Transaction, Algorithm and Exchange

Social scientists looking for the institutional foundations of capitalism have often missed the way in which market economies, of all sorts, rely on the particular ways in which monetary transactions are knitted together with a range of other agents. This mini conference focuses its attention on the everyday encounters with monetary devices, commercial circuits, algorithms and financial assessment and exchange. By doing so it aims to bridge two stimulating areas in current social research. The first is the move within the social study of finance away from the trading floor to the highly specific ways in which monetary transactions are made, thought about and experienced. The second includes studies following how “big” transactional data is not only becoming a means for visualizing, assessing and targeting specific groups, but is also enabling the transaction itself to become a crucial site of global economic production.

Papers with varied disciplinary backgrounds discussing the following issues are welcome:

– The intimate dimensions of monetary and financial transactions, whether in the moment of exchange itself, or before and after;

– The ways in which household finances become entangled with and affected by a range of socio-technical devices;

– Emerging financial products and services (e.g. subprime lending, credit score management services, department store credit cards, pawn shops and new way of banking) targeting domestic finance that are re-shaping the financial ecologies faced by consumers;

– New transactional technologies (e.g. algorithms, databases, payment cards) and their new ways of sorting, screening and valuing financial consumers;

– Domestic financial products and their entanglement with “high” finance and broader economic chains;

– Controversies, matters of concern, new affected groups, publics and commercial circuits being co-produced with contemporary domestic financial landscapes.

Organizers: Jeanne Lazarus, Mariana Luzzi, and José Ossandón

Mini-conferences are based around a selected number of focused themes, and have open submissions for panels and papers, based on an extended abstract (approx. 1000 words). Each mini-conference will consist of 2 to 6 panels. Each panel will have a discussant, meaning that selected participants must submit a completed paper by June 1st. If a paper proposal cannot be accommodated within a mini-conference, organizers will forward it to the program committee, who will pass it on to one of the networks as a regular submission. Click the title of each mini-conference for a full description of the theme. Submissions to the SASE conference must be made through one of the Mini-Conferences below (or through a research Network). Paper and session abstracts, as well as full papers for grant, prize, and stipend applications, must be submitted to a Network or Mini-Conference by January 20, 2014. Candidates will be notified by February 17, 2014. Please note that Mini-Conferences require an extended (~1,000 word) abstract, and ask that you submit a full paper by March 31, 2014. For further information, please contact the organizer of the mini-conference to which you are submitting.

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