Tag Archives: Attachment

New book: Markets and the Arts of Attachment

[Routledge acaba de publicar un nuevo libro – Markets and the Arts of Attachment, editado por Franck Cochoy, Joe Deville, Liz McFall – de posible interés para los lectores de este blog]

Markets and the Arts of Attachment (Hardback) book coverMarkets and the Arts of Attachment, edited by Franck Cochoy, Joe Deville, Liz McFall

Table of Contents

Introduction: Markets and the Arts of Attachment, (Liz McFall, Franck Cochoy, Joe Deville)

  1. From Social Ties to Socio-Economic Attachments: A Matter of Selection and Collection, (Franck Cochoy)
  2. Manufacturing the Consumer’s Truth: The Uses of Consumer Research in Advertising Inquiry, (Tomas Ariztia)
  3. Marketing and the Domestication of Social Media, (Kevin Mellet)
  4. Interfacing Attachments: The Multivalence of Brands, (Carolin Gerlitz)
  5. You are a Star Customer, Please Hold the Line…’: CRM and the Socio-Technical Inscriptions of Market Attachment, (Alexandre Mallard)
  6. The Market will Have you: The Arts of Market Attachment in a Digital Economy, (Liz McFall and Joe Deville)
  7. ‘My Story has no Strings Attached’: Credit Cards, Market Devices and a Stone Guest, (José Ossandón)
  8. From Market Relations to Romantic Ties: The Tests of Internet Dating, (Emmanuel Kessous)
  9. Acquiring Associations: On the Unexpected Social Consequences of Possessive Relations, (Hans Kjellberg)

Afterword: The Devices of Attachment, (Michel Callon)

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Where do groovy markets come from? A conversation with Liz McFall

Liz McFall (Head of the Department of Sociology at the Open University, one of the editors of the Journal of Cultural Economy and site manager of Charisma-Market Studies) has been crafting a very distinctive approach, in the context of recent SSF, to finance. She doesn’t write about esoteric derivatives but about domestic financial goods such as insurance and consumer lending. Most of her research is based on historical data, not on interviews or participant observation, and her conceptual interest is not calculation, rankings or formulae but charisma. In this conversation, carried out last May in Copenhagen, I use McFall’s last book Devising Consumption. Cultural Economies of Insurance, Credit and Spending as an excuse to make her expand on some of the characteristic features of her work.

Q1. Devising Consumption has five main chapters, accordingly have I prepared five questions, although, and I am sorry for that, my questions neither follow the order of the book nor do they necessarily correspond to particular chapters. Continue reading