Tag Archives: Callon

How to write after performativity? (part 1)

[Este es una prueba de un nuevo tipo de post en este blog. El nombre de la sección por ahora es “artículos en cuotas”. La idea es, como en una novela por entregas, ir subiendo partes de papers a medida que vayan saliendo. El texto abajo es un primer intento. Es un borrador de la primera parte de un capítulo para el libro A Routledge Companion to ANT, editado por Anders Blok, Ignacio Farías & Celia Roberts. Por cierto, sugerencias sobre como debería seguir la historia son muy bienvenidos]

How to write after performativity? José Ossandón.

First installment of a chapter prepared for A Routledge Companion to ANT, edited by Anders Blok, Ignacio Farías & Celia Roberts. Non-proof read draft.

I. The question

The editors of this volume confronted each invited contribution with a question. The question posed for this chapter is ‘how to write after performativity?’ What is this chapter about?

Performativity

This chapter is not about performativity at large. It is not about the ‘performativity turn’ (Muniesa 2014) in the social sciences and humanities. It is not about the philosophy of language of Austin and Searle, it is not about Butler or Derrida, and it is not about Lyotard. It is about the particular extension of Actor-Network theory initiated by Michel Callon to the study of markets, movement which is normally associated with the word performativity[1]. The chapter does not deal with all the different theories Callon has successfully introduced in the study of economic problems. The chapter only tangentially touches issues such as Callon’s particular approach to the qualification of goods (Callon et al 2002), hybrid forums, affected groups and technological democracy (Callon 2009, TCS), and innovation (Akrich et al 2002). The chapter focuses on what Callon has – in part in order to distinguish his own emphases from the many other branches of the performativity turn – termed ‘performation’[2]: his theory to explain the ‘emergence and logic of calculative agencies’ (Callon 1998a: 24).

After performativity

After, writes Peter Sloterdijk, ‘is the name for a break, an epoche, in the traditional sense of the word, which indicates both the caesura and also the time following it’ (Sloterdijk 2016: pp[3]). After performativity is, then, not against, versus, or even beyond performativity; it refers to the possibilities that have been opened and were not before the breach introduced by the theory of interest here. It is, as it were, about the performativity of performativity. Continue reading

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New book: Markets and the Arts of Attachment

[Routledge acaba de publicar un nuevo libro – Markets and the Arts of Attachment, editado por Franck Cochoy, Joe Deville, Liz McFall – de posible interés para los lectores de este blog]

Markets and the Arts of Attachment (Hardback) book coverMarkets and the Arts of Attachment, edited by Franck Cochoy, Joe Deville, Liz McFall

Table of Contents

Introduction: Markets and the Arts of Attachment, (Liz McFall, Franck Cochoy, Joe Deville)

  1. From Social Ties to Socio-Economic Attachments: A Matter of Selection and Collection, (Franck Cochoy)
  2. Manufacturing the Consumer’s Truth: The Uses of Consumer Research in Advertising Inquiry, (Tomas Ariztia)
  3. Marketing and the Domestication of Social Media, (Kevin Mellet)
  4. Interfacing Attachments: The Multivalence of Brands, (Carolin Gerlitz)
  5. You are a Star Customer, Please Hold the Line…’: CRM and the Socio-Technical Inscriptions of Market Attachment, (Alexandre Mallard)
  6. The Market will Have you: The Arts of Market Attachment in a Digital Economy, (Liz McFall and Joe Deville)
  7. ‘My Story has no Strings Attached’: Credit Cards, Market Devices and a Stone Guest, (José Ossandón)
  8. From Market Relations to Romantic Ties: The Tests of Internet Dating, (Emmanuel Kessous)
  9. Acquiring Associations: On the Unexpected Social Consequences of Possessive Relations, (Hans Kjellberg)

Afterword: The Devices of Attachment, (Michel Callon)

Continue reading

Where do groovy markets come from? A conversation with Liz McFall

Liz McFall (Head of the Department of Sociology at the Open University, one of the editors of the Journal of Cultural Economy and site manager of Charisma-Market Studies) has been crafting a very distinctive approach, in the context of recent SSF, to finance. She doesn’t write about esoteric derivatives but about domestic financial goods such as insurance and consumer lending. Most of her research is based on historical data, not on interviews or participant observation, and her conceptual interest is not calculation, rankings or formulae but charisma. In this conversation, carried out last May in Copenhagen, I use McFall’s last book Devising Consumption. Cultural Economies of Insurance, Credit and Spending as an excuse to make her expand on some of the characteristic features of her work.

Q1. Devising Consumption has five main chapters, accordingly have I prepared five questions, although, and I am sorry for that, my questions neither follow the order of the book nor do they necessarily correspond to particular chapters. Continue reading

Studying the Failures of Markets for Collective Concerns

[En diciembre pasado, con mis colegas Christian Frankel y Trine Pallesen organizamos el workshop “Markets for collective concerns?”. Escribimos un reporte sobre el evento para el último número de  EASST Review. Comienza así:]

“The workshop “Markets for Collective Concerns?”, that we co-orga­nized, was held at Copenhagen Business School last December 11th and 12th. These brief notes are not a summary. It is our attempt to start digesting the vertigo we still feel about the important questions and challenges for future social and STS inspired studies of markets that were posed during those two days. We will, hopefully, be able to produ­ce a clearer statement of these issues in the expected edited publication collecting the contributions to the workshop. […] The title of the workshop referred to markets that are created not only to ensure economic exchange, but also to deal with specific collective concerns -e.g. poverty, energy supply, and global warming. Markets developed as policy instruments.” Continue reading

Una sociología cultural del capitalismo contemporáneo. Comentario del libro “Divergencias. Trayectorias del neoliberalismo en Argentina y Chile” de Tomás Undurraga

Divergencias-717x1024[La categoría “debate” es una sección dedicada a discutir a partir de libros publicados por los contribuidores de Estudios de la Economía. En este post Federico Lorenc Valcarce continua el debate sobre Divergencias: trayectorias del neoliberalismo en Argentina y Chile (Ediciones UDP, 2014) iniciado por Aldo Madariaga. El debate a partir de este libro concluirá en unas semanas con una respuesta del autor Tomás Undurraga.]

El libro de Tomás Undurraga nos ofrece una comparación sistemática entre las variedades del capitalismo en Argentina y Chile, con especial énfasis en la fase neoliberal que se desarrolla desde los años 70’. Para hacerlo, construye un marco analítico que permite describir los derroteros de ambos países en torno a cuatro grandes dimensiones: la implantación de una sociedad neoliberal, las instituciones políticas y sociales que enmarcan al capitalismo contemporáneo, el papel de las empresas, los empresarios y el modo de organización del trabajo, la legitimación cultural del capitalismo en su fase actual. A partir de esta grilla conceptual, se ofrece un análisis de gran escala, que considera los fenómenos desde la perspectiva de los grandes agregados sociales y los marcos institucionales generales. Estos cuatro aspectos constituyen cada una de las partes del libro, precedidas por una discusión teórica y metodológica general que se presenta en la primera parte.

En comparación con otros trabajos sobre el desarrollo del capitalismo en América Latina, y en particular, comparado con los estudios sobre el neoliberalismo, el libro tiene la originalidad de problematizar las justificaciones ideológicas de los modelos existentes en ambos países, apoyándose para ello en la perspectiva de Boltanski y Chiapello. Continue reading

Offre de thèse: Dynamiques sociotechniques et processus d’innovation autour du machinisme pour l’agriculture familiale en Argentine et au Brésil

[De http://socioeco.hypotheses.org/2169Offre de thèse : Dynamiques sociotechniques et processus d’innovation autour du machinisme pour l’agriculture familiale en Argentine et au Brésil.

Continue reading

On ethnography, collaboration and social studies of finance besides performativity. An interview with Annelise Riles

Collateral KnowledgeAnnelise Riles’s (Professor of Law in Far East Legal Studies and Professor of Anthropology at Cornell) work is characterized by an intense and productive dialogue between law and anthropology. This results in a form of research which, simultaneously, brings legal reasoning to the center of the ethnographer’s concern (as an object of social scientific investigation) and makes this same reasoning a productive tool for anthropological inquiry. In this conversation carried out right after the workshop ‘Markets for Collective Concerns?’ held last December at Copenhagen Business School, Riles discusses her latest book on her long-term ethnographic work with financial regulators and lawyers in Japan, Collateral Knowledge, and her more recent articles on collaborative research. The interview was conducted by José Ossandón and Gustavo Onto helped elaborate the questions. Continue reading

Workshop: Markets for Collective Concerns? December 11th and 12th 2014, CBS.

Workshop: Markets for Collective Concerns? December 11th and 12th 2014, Copenhagen Business School.  Confirmed speakers: Daniel Breslau, Virginia Tech; Liliana Doganova & Brice Laurent, MINES ParisTech; Nicholas Gane, University of Warwick; Peter Karnøe, University of Aalborg; Philip Mirowski, University of Notre Dame; Daniel Neyland, Goldsmiths, University of London; Juan Pablo Pardo-Guerra, London School of Economics; Annelise Riles, Cornell University. Web site: http://www.cbs.dk/en/viden-samfundet/business-in-society/public-private/news/workshop-markets-collective-concern

Rationale

Despite the recent fall-out of finance, confidence in the market does not seem to be diminishing, but on the contrary, market mechanisms are becoming key instruments to deal with core contemporary collective concerns, including global warming and education (Mirowski 2013). This conference will be devoted to discuss the proliferation of markets that have been devised – not only to work economically – but also to solve collective issues in areas such as environmental pollution, security of supply of energy, quality of education, poverty and health care. Continue reading

Oxford Handbook of Sociology, Social Theory and Organization Studies Contemporary Currents

Oxford University Press publicó recientemente el Oxford Handbook of Sociology, Social Theory and Organization Studies Contemporary Currents editado por Paul S. Adler, Paul du Gay, Glenn Morgan y Michael Reed. El libro es una colección de 30 capítulos, la mayoría escrito por autores que han inspirado algunas de las discusiones en este blog (como F. Cochoy, B. Czarniawska, M. Power, P. Miller) y de temas tales como Garfinkel, Luhmann, Callon, Latour, Foucault, economía de las convenciones y análisis comparado del capitalismo. Entre ellos va el capítulo: “What’s new in the ‘new, new economic sociology’ and should Organization Studies care?” de Liz McFall & José Ossandón (para los interesados una versión de borrador disponible acá). Link a tabla de contenido y capítulo de introducción: Continue reading

Mariana Heredia responde a las reseñas de A quoi sert un économiste

M. Heredia Cover[La categoría “debate” es una sección dedicada a discutir a partir de libros publicados por los contribuidores de Estudios de la Economía. En este post Mariana Heredia responde el debate iniciado por Antoine Maillet y Gustavo Onto sobre el libro A quoi sert un économiste. Enquête sur les nouvelles technologies de gouvernement (La Découverte 2014)]

A veces el profesionalismo parece alentar cierta cacofonía: cada uno dice lo suyo, se multiplican los sistemas formales de evaluación y al mismo tiempo languidecen las pasiones y escasean los diálogos. Me gustaría empezar agradeciendo a José por remar contra-corriente, asignando un espacio al comentario de nuestros libros. Esta iniciativa se suma a otras, pensadas para valorizar nuestro trabajo, no desde un espíritu publicitario o corporativo, sino desde la convicción de que es posible alentar críticas constructivas y nutrir la reflexión conjunta. Gracias también muy especialmente a Antoine Maillet y Gustavo Onto por el esfuerzo de leer detenidamente el libro, resaltar sus fortalezas y apuntar sus debilidades. Para aprovechar mejor este espacio, me limito a agradecer la presentación de los contenidos y la mención de sus aciertos para concentrarme en las objeciones planteadas. Continue reading