Tag Archives: Tarjetas

New book: Markets and the Arts of Attachment

[Routledge acaba de publicar un nuevo libro – Markets and the Arts of Attachment, editado por Franck Cochoy, Joe Deville, Liz McFall – de posible interés para los lectores de este blog]

Markets and the Arts of Attachment (Hardback) book coverMarkets and the Arts of Attachment, edited by Franck Cochoy, Joe Deville, Liz McFall

Table of Contents

Introduction: Markets and the Arts of Attachment, (Liz McFall, Franck Cochoy, Joe Deville)

  1. From Social Ties to Socio-Economic Attachments: A Matter of Selection and Collection, (Franck Cochoy)
  2. Manufacturing the Consumer’s Truth: The Uses of Consumer Research in Advertising Inquiry, (Tomas Ariztia)
  3. Marketing and the Domestication of Social Media, (Kevin Mellet)
  4. Interfacing Attachments: The Multivalence of Brands, (Carolin Gerlitz)
  5. You are a Star Customer, Please Hold the Line…’: CRM and the Socio-Technical Inscriptions of Market Attachment, (Alexandre Mallard)
  6. The Market will Have you: The Arts of Market Attachment in a Digital Economy, (Liz McFall and Joe Deville)
  7. ‘My Story has no Strings Attached’: Credit Cards, Market Devices and a Stone Guest, (José Ossandón)
  8. From Market Relations to Romantic Ties: The Tests of Internet Dating, (Emmanuel Kessous)
  9. Acquiring Associations: On the Unexpected Social Consequences of Possessive Relations, (Hans Kjellberg)

Afterword: The Devices of Attachment, (Michel Callon)

Continue reading

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Créditos al consumo, cálculos y big data: José Ossandón en UNSAM

“My Story Has No Strings Attached”: Credit Cards, Market Devices, and a Stone Guest

[Los amigos del Institute for Money, Technology and Financial Inclusion- UC Irvine publicaron como documento de trabajo, la versión actual de un experimento sobre deudas y tarjetas de crédito en Chile del que ya hemos discutido acá]

My Story Has No Strings Attached”: Credit Cards, Market Devices, and a Stone Guest. José Ossandón

Abstract

In the retail industry, consumer credit is sometimes seen as a dangerous parasite that can become bigger than its host. Credit cards are marketing devices that aim at easing the attachment between consumers and goods. Credit cards are also value meters that trace every single transaction. Credit cards can even be “gardening” tools. Sowing is the name used in Chile’s retail industry to call the data management strategy that consists of extending the credit limit of low income customers depending on their payment behavior. Data on previous transactions and behavior replaces collateral. Credit cards are not only used by the persons whose names are on the cards; People borrow and loan their cards, or, more precisely, their cards’ credit limits. Credit cards do not trace behavior but hidden networks. Can social relations act as parasites on credit – uninvited guests whose host is already a parasite? This article tells the story of a study that started in the middle – credit cards – and slowly became a Serresian economic anthropology. Continue reading

Low and high finance studies after performativity: a speculative workshop report

[Como parte de nuestra colaboración inter-redes publicamos este post conjuntamente con Charisma-Network y Socializing Finance. Como siempre, comentarios – en español o inglés – son muy bienvenidos]

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On June 21 and 22 I participated in the workshop “Understanding the Knitting: new methods for investigating the interactions of low and high finance” supported by The Open and Leicester universities and organized by Joe Deville, Karen D. Ho, Liz McFall, Yuval Millo and Zsuzsanna Vargha. As expected -considering the excellent line-up and the space given by the organizers for open experimental presentations -, this was a very rich, interesting and fun event. In this quite (I am sorry for that) dense text, I draw from what happened in the workshop in order to suggest a series of questions speculating about the knots knitting “low” and “high” finance and our place as finance students there. Continue reading